The Burning Sand

Event

15 FEB 2013

The Burning Sand

JL Williams followed by
CORRECTO onstage 10.30,
then records and dancing til 2am
courtesy of Anna Cook, Torsten Lauschmann & Sarah Lowndes

  The Burning Sand is a bi-annual magazine edited by Sarah Lowndes and designed by Sophie Dyer & Maeve Redmond, and bimonthly event at The Poetry Club.  The Burning Sand Volume I launched at The Poetry Club on Friday 19th April, 2013.
The Burning Sand features creative and critical writings and drawings from artists, musicians and writers involved in the unique and largely self-initiated arts infrastructure in Glasgow.  The magazine is also designed, edited and printed in the city and means to plough the furrow of Critical Regionalism outlined by Kenneth Frampton in “Towards a Critical Regionalism: Six Points for an Architecture of Resistance” (1983). Our intention, in Frampton’s words, is to ‘mediate the impact of universal civilization with elements derived indirectly from the peculiarities of a particular place.’

Since the collapse of Glasgow’s heavy industries post-WWII, the city’s predominately self-organised and autonomous arts scene has grown exponentially, fuelled by the twin energies of class politics and youth culture.  The aesthetic of necessity apparent since the late 70s in the photocopied placards, posters, fanzines and flyers of Glasgow-based activists and artists continues to shape the activities of local non-profit organisations today.  The city’s many independent exhibition spaces, music venues, record labels and publishing imprints continue to champion work that is process-based, rooted in social co-operation and often realised with an economy of means and materials. Since the collapse of Glasgow’s heavy industries post-WWII, the city’s predominately self-organised and autonomous arts scene has grown exponentially, fuelled by the twin energies of class politics and youth culture.  The aesthetic of necessity apparent since the late 70s in the photocopied placards, posters, fanzines and flyers of Glasgow-based activists and artists continues to shape the activities of local non-profit organisations today.  The city’s many independent exhibition spaces, music venues, record labels and publishing imprints continue to champion work that is process-based, rooted in social co-operation and often realised with an economy of means and materials. 

 

In the first issue the contributors are a mix of emergent and established artists: Giles Bailey, Rob Churm, Romany Dear, Mark Hamilton, Ashanti Harris, Chris Johanson, Tom Worthington, Richard Wright, and working collaboratively, Katy Edelsten & Annie Hazelwood, Barry Burns & Louise Shelley and Laura Smith & Rebecca Wilcox. It is 48 pages, black and white throughout, with a colour cover

   www.theburningsand.com